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Top Tips for Effective Logo Design

A logo will always be the most important graphic you ever produce for a client. Not only will it act as a visual foundation for the future, it should also represent everything you need to know about the company, whether that be a product, service or even core values.

“The strongest logos tell simple stories” – Sol Sender

A logo will always be the most important graphic you ever produce for a client. Not only will it act as a visual foundation for the future, it should also represent everything you need to know about the company, whether that be a product, service or even core values. The tips below will highlight the most important factors to consider when designing a new logo:

Your brand at a glance

This one may seem obvious, but it’s often overlooked. Before even thinking about conceptualising a design, it’s worth considering how you want the logo to make your customers feel. Addressing this question early on will then help to influence design decisions at a later stage.

Keep it clean and simple

Logos should be memorable, and the key here is to keep things both clean and simple. Designs that are too complex can lead to ambiguity and confusion. The most effective businesses opt for the simplest solution to solving a problem, and this ideology carries through to the branding.

Designing for purpose

Whilst a logo design can look great blown up to 100% at full screen, it is vital that you consider how it looks when used in situ. For example, logos are often scaled down for websites meaning that any small text in the design will now become difficult to read.

Be literal

Some of the most famous logo designs are the most literal, these designs utilise icons to highlight the company or business name. Some examples (like the ones below) feature two icons or images wrapped into one to demonstrate a clever interpretation of a concept or idea. If you opt for this route, it’s always best to use vector-based graphics to ensure the design always looks sharp!

Choosing colour

Never underestimate the importance of colour in your design as it plays a crucial role in determining your brand’s message. For example, a brighter green would be an excellent choice for a renewable company as the colour can represent energy, nature and harmony. There is a science behind every colour and it can definitely impact your audience, always research similar companies to gain a better understanding on what colours to use. Read our Branding & Identity post for more info on colour – https://bit.ly/357NOWm

Using colour

In most logo designs, the application of colour is just as important as the colour itself. For example, yellow can speak volumes about a company, but it may not be the best choice of colour for the logo’s text. The resulting design may look over-saturated with the text becoming too difficult to read. Visual salience is a term that describes how colour can be used to accentuate or compliment the overall design. For example, Amazon’s logo utilises an orange arrow whilst the text remains black, the result is an impactful logo which uses a careful balance of colour rather than an overabundance of it.

RGB vs CMYK

Whilst we’re on the subject of colour, it’s also important to consider how the look of your logo can change whether you’re designing for screen or print. The below example illustrates how an RGB blue can lose its impact when converted to CMYK for print. Experimentation is key here, convert colours, print examples and try to ensure that the final logo is fit for purpose.

Difference in RGB and CMYK colour

Don’t overthink it!

Whilst there’s definitely important factors to consider for logo design, there’s also nothing wrong with opting for a design that you feel “works”. A logo doesn’t have to be conceptual in design, it needs to be impactful and resonate with your target audience. Fashion brands often take this route, opting solely for the brand name in a striking font to evoke a premium feel.

If you find yourself having to explain your visual cue or idea to the end user, the brief hasn’t been met and the concept isn’t clear in its execution. Simply put, don’t overthink it!

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